Acacia salicina

Willow Acacia, Australian Willow

Boething Treeland Farms grows over 1,200 varieties of trees, shrubs, perennials and specialty plants on ten California nurseries to serve the wholesale landscape and nursery industries throughout the Western United States and beyond.

Plant Type: Trees

Evergreen-Deciduous: Evergreen

Overall Mature Size: Medium

Mature Height & Spread: 20-40' x 15'

Natural Growth Habit: Weeping

Native To: Australia/New Zealand

Exposure: Full Sun, Partial Shade

Water: Low Water

Flower Color: Yellow

Bloom Time: Spring, Winter

Special Features: Attracts Birds/Butterflies / Cold Hardy / Deer Resistant / Drought Resistant / Hedge / Screen / Seacoast Conditions

Container Sizes: #15, 24" Box

Sunset Garden Zones: 8, 9, 12-24

Minimum USDA Hardiness Zone: 7 - 10

A Bit More

Linear, blue-green leaves on a frame of spreading, weeping branches, give the Acacia salicina a willow-like appearance without the water requirements of a true willow. Yellow, pollen-laden flowers on this Australian native provides a food source for bees and butterflies and offers a showy display from winter to spring. This evergreen tree prefers good drainage in dry soil and tolerates seaside conditions. The Aborigines used the high-tannin bark in medicine, as a toxin for fishing, and in tanning. Seeds were eaten by indigenous people, but it should be noted that it is a potential allergen and poison hazard. The Willow Acacia is a good choice for a low-water use garden or desert landscape, and its moderately-dense canopy is easily pruned into a screen or hedge.

A Bit More

Linear, blue-green leaves on a frame of spreading, weeping branches, give the Acacia salicina a willow-like appearance without the water requirements of a true willow. Yellow, pollen-laden flowers on this Australian native provides a food source for bees and butterflies and offers a showy display from winter to spring. This evergreen tree prefers good drainage in dry soil and tolerates seaside conditions. The Aborigines used the high-tannin bark in medicine, as a toxin for fishing, and in tanning. Seeds were eaten by indigenous people, but it should be noted that it is a potential allergen and poison hazard. The Willow Acacia is a good choice for a low-water use garden or desert landscape, and its moderately-dense canopy is easily pruned into a screen or hedge.