Chondropetalum tectorum

Cape Rush

Boething Treeland Farms grows over 1,200 varieties of trees, shrubs, perennials and specialty plants on ten California nurseries to serve the wholesale landscape and nursery industries throughout the Western United States and beyond.

Plant Type: Grasses / Shrubs

Evergreen-Deciduous: Evergreen

Overall Mature Size: Small

Also Grown As: Bush

Mature Height & Spread: 2-3' x 3-4'

Natural Growth Habit: Vase, Mounding

Native To: Africa

Exposure: Full Sun, Partial Shade

Water: High Water, Medium Water

Flower Color: White

Special Features: Seacoast Conditions / Shade Tolerant

Container Sizes: #1, #5

Sunset Garden Zones: 8, 9, 14-24

A Bit More

Wafting gently in a summer breeze, the 3’ tall flower laden branches of this grass-like shrub bring the rustling sounds of its native South African to mind. Its dark green stems become punctuated by brown sheath joints which give it a striped effect.  Topping out at 3 feet tall with a 3-4’ spread and accented with brown flowers late in the season, it makes a lovely addition to drought-stricken or seaside landscapes as it adapts well to a lack or an abundance of water.  Tolerant of most soil types and virtually maintenance free, this evergreen is best used in full sun at the coast but partial sun inland.  Commonly referred to as “Cape Rush”, it, or more likely its close but larger cousin Chondropetalum elephantinum, is used as a thatching material on aboriginal rooftops.

A Bit More

Wafting gently in a summer breeze, the 3’ tall flower laden branches of this grass-like shrub bring the rustling sounds of its native South African to mind. Its dark green stems become punctuated by brown sheath joints which give it a striped effect.  Topping out at 3 feet tall with a 3-4’ spread and accented with brown flowers late in the season, it makes a lovely addition to drought-stricken or seaside landscapes as it adapts well to a lack or an abundance of water.  Tolerant of most soil types and virtually maintenance free, this evergreen is best used in full sun at the coast but partial sun inland.  Commonly referred to as “Cape Rush”, it, or more likely its close but larger cousin Chondropetalum elephantinum, is used as a thatching material on aboriginal rooftops.