Satureja douglasii (Clinopodium douglasii)

Yerba Buena

Boething Treeland Farms grows over 1,200 varieties of trees, shrubs, perennials and specialty plants on ten California nurseries to serve the wholesale landscape and nursery industries throughout the Western United States and beyond.

Plant Type: Ground Covers

Evergreen-Deciduous: Evergreen

Overall Mature Size: Small

Also Grown As: Bush

Mature Height & Spread: 6" x 3'

Natural Growth Habit: Spreading

Native To: California, Pacific Northwest

Exposure: Partial Shade

Water: Medium Water, Low Water

Flower Color: White

Bloom Time: Spring, Summer

Special Features: Deer Resistant / Drought Resistant / Edible / Fragrant

Container Sizes: #1

Sunset Garden Zones: 4-9, 14-24

Minimum USDA Hardiness Zone: 7-10

A Bit More

Named Yerba Buena, or ‘good herb (hierba)’ in Spanish, Satureja douglasii is ‘buena’ for many reasons. Drought, shade, sand and clay tolerant, this beautiful green ground cover will root and grow in a variety of environments. But not to worry: this well-behaved herb roots along its stems and grows a modest 6” tall and 3’ wide. Previously known as Clinopodium douglasii, Satureja is found in woodland areas, particularly along the coast, where it is seen under Oaks, Redwoods, and Madrones. When crushed, the leaves release a pleasing, minty scent. Indigenous peoples of California used the leaves in a tea to aid sleep, digestive distress and arthritis. These days, you may see it muddled in a refreshing cocktail. Use Yerba Buena in rockeries, under tree canopies, or trailing over wall edges and containers.

A Bit More

Named Yerba Buena, or ‘good herb (hierba)’ in Spanish, Satureja douglasii is ‘buena’ for many reasons. Drought, shade, sand and clay tolerant, this beautiful green ground cover will root and grow in a variety of environments. But not to worry: this well-behaved herb roots along its stems and grows a modest 6” tall and 3’ wide. Previously known as Clinopodium douglasii, Satureja is found in woodland areas, particularly along the coast, where it is seen under Oaks, Redwoods, and Madrones. When crushed, the leaves release a pleasing, minty scent. Indigenous peoples of California used the leaves in a tea to aid sleep, digestive distress and arthritis. These days, you may see it muddled in a refreshing cocktail. Use Yerba Buena in rockeries, under tree canopies, or trailing over wall edges and containers.